Assessment Week: Foundation Knowledge Questions 2016/17

Assessment Week History.

During this week you will complete two History activities within your normal timetabled History lesson (Monday or Friday)

Activity 1: A 20 question knowledge test. We will test you on 20 questions selected from the list of 60 below. You are expected to achieve at least 75%. If you fail to meet this target you will redo the Knowledge Test.

Activity 2: You will be given 1 hour and 20 minutes to write an essay response to the question you have been exploring throughout Unit 5. You are allowed to use the tables completed in class but nothing else.

The question you are answering is:

Which event in Britain’s history had the most impact in bringing about Democracy for all?

Structure:

Introduction – introducing the question

3 x PEE or PEAR paragraphs – exploring the question.

Conclusion – answering the question. 


Within History you are expected to develop your own Knowledge through revising for and completing regular Knowledge Quizzes. You will be quizzed on all the questions below across the Foundation year.

To successfully progress from Foundation and into Level 1 you MUST regularly get above 75% as a score on the Knowledge Quizzes.

So study the questions, find the answers and get revising, ready for The History Knowledge Quiz

  1. When did the Romans FIRST invade Britain?
  2. Who was their leader?
  3. What did the Romans call London?
  4. In what year did the Romans leave Britain?
  5. Where did Anglo-Saxons come from?
  6. Where did the Viking invaders come from?
  7. What 3 leaders wanted the English throne in 1066?
  8. What was the famous battle that happened just before the Battle of Hastings?
  9. On what hill was the Battle of Hastings, 1066, fought?
  10. Who won the Battle of Hastings in 1066?
  11. When was the first Crusade?
  12. When did King John sign the Magna Carta?
  13. What does Magna Carta mean in English?
  14. Who was the first Tudor Monarch King?
  15. How many wives did Henry VIII Have?
  16. In what order did Henry VIII children rule?
  17. When did the Spanish Armada try to invade England?
  18. When did the English civil War begin?
  19. Which king had his head chopped off?
  20. Who ruled England after the King was executed?
  21. When did the French Revolution take place?
  22. In 1776, which country declared independence from England?
  23. What was Edward Jenner the first person to do
  24. What year did England pass the Slavery Abolition Act?
  25. What was the name of the Battle in which England beat Napoléon in 1815?
  26. When did the Peterloo Massacre take place?
  27. What was the name of the Book written by Adolf Hitler? (In German and English).
  28. Who was killed triggering the events leading to WW1?
  29. What was the name of the two cities onto which the two atomic bombs were dropped in 1945?
  30. Name the three European dictators between the wars from Germany, Russia and Italy and what year did each come to power?
  31. When did the Great War take Place?
  32. What type of warfare was used during World War I?
  33. Who was shot in Sarajevo, the spark that led to the Great War?
  34. In which country was most of World War I fought?
  35. Which two countries were allied with England at the start of the war?
  36. What does Imperialism mean?
  37. What was the name of the Peace Treaty that ended the war?
  38. What were the four MAIN causes of the Great War?
  39. What does militarism mean?
  40. What were the two alliances Europe was divided into called?
  41. When, officially, did the Great War end?
  42. Which country was blamed for the war?
  43. What are Reparations?
  44. What new weapons made their debut in the Great War?
  45. Who were the most important three men at the end of the Great War?
  46. What name were they known by?
  47. What International peace keeping agency was set up at the end of the war?
  48. Did Germany sign the Peace Treaty?
  49. True or False: Could Germany keep all its army and colonies after the war?
  50. Who shot Franz Ferdinand?
  51. When was Franz Ferdinand shot?
  52. When was the Great Reform Act passed?
  53. What is suffrage?
  54. In 1830 Parliament was mostly made up of which social class?
  55. What is Democracy?
  56. When did the Rebecca Riots begin?
  57. When were the Spa Field Riots?
  58. What is a consistency?
  59. When was Magna Carta signed?
  60. What is Chartism?

Unit Outline:

Big Question: Which event in Britain’s history had the most impact in bringing about Democracy for all?   

What am I learning? You will learn about the growth of Democracy in Britain and about key events which pushed forward its development. You will consider how the democracy we have today came into existence. You will identify which event you believe was the most important in pushing forward democracy between 1215 and today.

How will I learn? You will come to understand the details of and impact of a range of events from the story of democratisation within Britain. You will work as a Learning Set to complete a detailed information table applying your Source analysis, Research & Record skills. You will use this table to help you to present your Knowledge Understanding and Skills in the form of a forum debate and in an A3 diagram (no essay this time YAY).

Why am I learning this? Democracy is a hugely important political idea which shapes our world, politically, socially and economically. Wars have been fought over democracy, with the ongoing conflict within Syria an example of this. Britain is considered to be one of the most democratic countries in the world, but what made us this? Democracy is still debated today even in Britain. For example most (not all) 18 year olds have the vote today but should 16 or 14 year olds? The recent EU referendum, Yes or No, what is that all about? We will also link to English and the idea of different form of democracy as Utopias or Dystopias (think back to Unit 1 and Maslow’s hierarchy and your civilisations). 

How will I be assessed? The particular skill being assessed is Communication of the past: Change and Continuity. You will explore the question: Which event in Britain’s history had the most impact in bringing about Democracy for all? By the end of the unit you will present your KUS through a debate and in the form of a diagram presented to your learning Set, Class, Year and then showcased to the whole school on the digital signage. The best will be tweeted to the world. 

To help you move your learning forward we have organised the following Home Learning:

Week 1: What led to the growth of Democracy in England? (Complete on Google Docs and share with your teacher and Learning Set) 

Week 2: research and complete 2-4 of the next events on the note taking sheet (see class slides and exercise books to help)

Week 3: research and complete outstanding events on the note taking sheet (see class slides and exercise books)

Week 4: complete the first draft of the A3 diagram (see class slides) ensuring the diagram meets the I can descriptors below and in your books. Revise for the 40 question Knowledge Test (see questions below).

Week 5: complete the final draft of the A3 diagram (see class slides) ensuring the diagram meets the I can descriptors below.


 

Self Assessment: I Cans…

Working at Describing-Applying Level

  • describe 3 or more changes in democracy using a range of factual examples.
  • show how causal factors (PIE-PSE) brought about changes in democracy.                                                                           
  • describe the historical significance of your chosen event in how it changed democracy.                                      
  • describe the relationship between your chosen event and today’s democracy.
  • communicate the above through a diagram, using words and images.

Working at Applying-Analysing Level

  • explain 3 or more changes in democracy using a range of factual examples.
  • explain how causal factors (PIE-PSE) brought about changes in democracy.                                                                           
  • explain the historical significance of your chosen event, using DBL, in how it changed democracy.                                      
  • explain the relationship between your chosen event and today’s democracy.
  • communicate the above through a diagram, using words and images.

Working at Analysing-Evaluating Level

  • analyse 3 or more changes in democracy using a range of factual examples.
  • analyse, through comparison, how causal factors (PIE-PSE) brought about changes in democracy.                                                                           
  • analyse the historical significance of your chosen event, using DBL and comparison to other events, in how it changed democracy.                                      
  • analyse the relationship between your chosen event and today’s democracy.
  • communicate the above through a diagram, using words and images.

 

Knowledge Test, new 10 Questions to add to the last 30 🙂

1, When was the Great Reform Act passed?

2, What is suffrage?

3, In 1830 Parliament was mostly made up of…..

  1. a)    Middle-class industrialists
  2. b)   Tory Landowner
  3. c)    Working class radical

4, What is Democracy?

5, When was the Peterloo Massacre?

6, When did the Rebecca Riots begin?

7, When were the Spa Field Riots?

8, A constituency is…..

  1. a)    a person that sits in Parliament.
  2. b)   an area of the country represented by an MP.
  3. c)    A choice in an election or other group decision.

9, When was Magna Carta signed?      

10, What is Chartism?

 

The Evolution of English Democracy: A Timeline CLICK HERE

Magna Carta: 1215 a start for Democracy?

 

Session 1-2:

Session 3-4:

Additional Challenge Activity: Research and present on the Suffrage Movement CLICK HERE

Session 5-6

Session 7-8

Session 9-10

Additional Debate opportunity:

 

Useful website: A History of Parliament CLICK HERE

Useful website: Magna Carta CLICK HERE

Useful website: Impact of Magna Carta CLICK HERE

Useful website: What is Democracy? CLICK HERE

Useful website: The Future of Democracy CLICK HERE

Useful website to help you with Session 6 Home Learning CLICK HERE. 

Unit 3: Balance

Please find below an outline of expectations to support the sheets already provided in class.

Be reminded that you are working towards having published a story, an empathetic and historical account of past migration.

Writing Style

As discussed in class the story needs to

  • be written in the first person
  • include emotions, feelings and rich description (sights, sounds, smells, tastes)
  • be factually accurate
  • include push factors and pull factors such as political,social and economic reasons for the migration
  • cover all stages of the journey (emigration, migration, immigration, settlement)
  • be presented as either a diary, a reflection on past events (memoir) or an ongoing story

Sections of the Story

  1. Why you left your country of origin
  2. Why you chose to come to England
  3. What your journey was like
  4. What happened when you arrived
  5. Where did you settle
  6. What were the reactions of locals
  7. How did you effect the society you became part of

Criteria for success

 

A range of sentences using a range of techniques e.g. alliteration, punctuation, metaphor, quotes, speech and rhetorical questions for example
Push factors  – a few reasons why they migrated from the country of origin
Pull factors – explain what attracted them to England
Key words – social, political, economic, environmental, immigrant, migrant, migration, refugee, asylum, push and pull factors.
Description of the route – how did they get to the UK? How far did they have to travel? Was it dangerous.  This could be an illustration.  
Further explanation e.g. if there was a war, when, why & how did it happen
Links to Geography – connect this historical migration story to the story you are writing in Geography. Are any of these historical experiences similar to your own?
Maps and an illustration – include a map using google maps to show the route and location of the country you are describing.  Include an artefact from that country and historical period.
ICT is used carefully – size 11 arial font, (size 12 and bold for the title). make a record of any websites/sources you use.
Extra challenge
An evaluation of the long term impact on Britain as a result of this historical migration

Unit Expectations:

This Unit is designed to enable you to develop the following:

  • To explain the causes of an effect/consequence
  • To categorise consequences
  • To begin measuring effects of historical actions
  • To enhance Research & Record skills
  • To apply Collaboration within History
  • To act upon feedback.      

The Outline of this Unit can be found here. A copy should also be attached to your class books alongside your grade card.

Unit2Mat

Grade Card:

Use this grade card to help you track your skills progress. Your goal is to be able to evidence every level of skill listed on this card. Unit2gradecardDiscoveryKnowledge Questions:

Within History you are expected to develop your own Knowledge through revising for and completing regular Knowledge Quizzes. You will be quizzed on all the questions listed at the bottom of this page across the Foundation year.

To successfully progress from Foundation and into Level 1 you MUST regularly get above 80% as a score on the Knowledge Quizzes.

These are the first 10 questions that you will be tested upon. 100% i possible if you work together as a Learning Set to find and check the answers.

So study the questions, find the answers and get revising, ready for The History Knowledge Quiz

  1. When did the Romans FIRST invade Britain?

  2. Who was their leader?

  3. What did the Romans call London?

  4. In what year did the Romans leave Britain?

  5. Where did Anglo-Saxons come from?

  6. Where did the Viking invaders come from?

  7. What 3 leaders wanted the English throne in 1066?

  8. What was the famous battle that happened just before the Battle of Hastings?

  9. On what hill was the Battle of Hastings, 1066, fought?

  10. Who won the Battle of Hastings in 1066?

When giving feedback to your Learning Set we like you to use the following supportive and collaborative approach:

Use the following slides as a guide to help you improve your work and learning:

 


Session 1-2:

Watch out for new resources and session slides here.

Session 3-4

Session 5-6

Session 7-8

Session 9-10

Session 11-12

 

Use this link to find help to complete the written assignment. 

Unit 1: When people work together they can achieve a common goal.

Unit1Mat

  • Full details of the Unit can be found here (Click Me)
  • Track your Progress against I can…statements using the sheet linked (click here).

When giving feedback to your Learning Set we like you to use the following supportive and collaborative approach:

Use the following slides as a guide to help you improve your work and learning:

Weekly Skills Master Classes can be found here (Click me).

 

In this Unit you will work as a Learning Set to produce a number of products and artefacts. In Session 6 you will begin working to produce these products.
Details of each product and some examples of last years can be found here (Click me).

All Learning Sessions for this Unit can be viewed below

Session 1-2

Session 3-4

Session 5-6

Session 7-8

Session 9-10

 

 

Use this sheet to help you deal with sources and evidence during this project.

SourceAnalysis-2

Session 11-12

Session 13-14

Session 15-16

Session 17-18

Session 19-20

Half Term:

Your task is to complete your own part of the final LS Civilisation presentation. Remember that the presentation will be made to parents and teachers. All will need to be ready for presentation the week after we get back from the holidays. 

 

 

Unit 3 Knowledge Questions

Revise the following for the Knowledge Test

  1. When did the Romans FIRST invade Britain?
  2. Who was their leader?
  3. What did the Romans call London?
  4. In what year did the Romans leave Britain?
  5. Where did Anglo-Saxons come from?
  6. Where did the Viking invaders come from?
  7. What 3 leaders wanted the English throne in 1066?
  8. What was the famous battle that happened just before the Battle of Hastings?
  9. On what hill was the Battle of Hastings, 1066, fought?
  10. Who won the Battle of Hastings in 1066?
  11. When was the first Crusade?
  12. When did King John sign the Magna Carta?
  13. What does Magna Carta mean in English?
  14. Who was the first Tudor Monarch King?
  15. How many wives did Henry VIII Have?
  16. In what order did Henry VIII children rule?
  17. When did the Spanish Armada try to invade England?
  18. When did the English civil War begin?
  19. Which king had his head chopped off?
  20. Who ruled England after the King was executed?

unit 3

Key terms: Refugee, Asylum seeker, Immigrant, emigrant, economic migrant, emigrate, emigration, immigration, internal migrant, rural to urban migration, push and pull factors, political, social, economic, environmental, interpretation.

Home Learning Tasks:

By week 2: I have completed research about the who, where, when, what, why of the migration story for the migrant group. I have also found 1-2 accounts about how the migrant group has been treated.

By week 3: I have identified the positive and negative impact of this migration to Britain on a range of people. I have categorised the impact of this migration (PSE).

By week 4: I have written, in my book, the first completed draft of my historical migration story meeting the expectations outlined on the criteria.

By week 5: I have written up in my book, displaying high levels of excellence, and submitted my historical migration story meeting all expectations outlined on the criteria.

All Home Learning activities for this unit can be accessed here. CLICK ME

Session 1-2

Resources to help you research your migrant group

Immigrant group Resources
Roman immigration 1st Century AD Use any resources you can including the Internet and the Library. The following is a good starting point:  http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/ancient-rome/the-romans-in-britain/
Jewish immigration 11th Century onwards Use any resources you can including the Internet and the Library. The following is a good starting point: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_England
Huguenot immigration 18th Century Use any resources you can including the Internet and the Library. The following is a good starting point: http://www.bbc.co.uk/legacies/immig_emig/england/london/article_1.shtml
Irish immigration 19th Century Use any resources you can including the Internet and the Library. The following is a good starting point: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_migration_to_Great_Britain
Commonwealth immigration 20th Century Use any resources you can including the Internet and the Library. The following is a good starting point: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pathways/citizenship/brave_new_world/immigration.htm
Also try: http://www.migrationwatchuk.org/Briefingpaper/document/48 and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_immigration_to_Great_Britain

Session 3-4

Master Class 1: Push and Pull factors behind immigration

Master Class 2: Historical Interpretations 

 

Session 5-6

Self and Peer Assessment Criteria:

Use the checklist below to help you to gather what you need in order to produce your historical migration story. This is your ongoing Home Learning activity. Each week we will check what you have done and provide guidance on what to do next.

Checklist: – What to include in your historical migration story P S T
A range of sentences using a range of techniques e.g. alliteration, punctuation, metaphor, quotes, speech and rhetorical questions for example
Push factors  – a few reasons why they migrated from the country of origin
Pull factors – explain what attracted them to England
Key words – social, political, economic, environmental, immigrant, migrant, migration, refugee, asylum, push and pull factors.
Description of the route – how did they get to the UK? How far did they have to travel? Was it dangerous.  This could be an illustration.  
Further explanation e.g. if there was a war, when, why & how did it happen
Links to Geography – connect this historical migration story to the story you are writing in Geography. Are any of these historical experiences similar to your own?
Maps and an illustration – include a map using google maps to show the route and location of the country you are describing.  Include an artefact from that country and historical period.
ICT is used carefully – size 11 arial font, (size 12 and bold for the title). make a record of any websites/sources you use.
Extra challenge
An evaluation of the long term impact on Britain as a result of this historical migration